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Last updated on: 6/26/2008 1:34:00 PM PST
What Was the 1947 United Nations Partition Plan (a.k.a. UN General Assembly Resolution 181)?


General Reference (not clearly pro or con)
The United Nations document from 1990, titled "The Origins and Evolution of the Palestine Problem: 1917-1988, Part II 1947-1977," contained the following description of the UN Partition Plan:

"The resolution of the General Assembly to partition Palestine, identified as resolution 181 (II), in effect constituted a recommendation 'to the United Kingdom, as the Mandatory Power, and to all other Members of the United Nations the adoption and implementation, with regard to the future government of Palestine, of the Plan of Partition with Economic Union ...', requesting the Security Council to 'undertake the necessary measures as provided in the plan for its implementation ...'

Palestine was to be divided into an un-named 'Jewish State' and an un-named 'Arab State'. Great Britain was to withdraw its presence by 1 August 1948, however making available by 1 February 1948 to the Jewish State an area including a seaport to facilitate 'substantial immigration'. During the transitional period beginning in November 1947, the United Nations would progressively take over the administration in the entire territory, to be exercised through a Commission, and power handed over to the two States on the day of independence, not later than 1 October 1948. The two States were to be linked in an economic union.

The territory of Palestine was divided into eight parts. Three were allotted to the Jewish State, three to the Arab State. The seventh, Jaffa, was to form an Arab enclave in Jewish territory. The eighth part was to be Jerusalem as a corpus separatum under a special international régime. This was to be administered by the United Nations Trusteeship Council for an initial period of 10 years, at the end of which the scheme would be re-examined by the Council, and 'the residents of the city shall then be free to express by means of a referendum their wishes as to possible modification of the régime of the City'."

Full Text: 1947 UN Resolution 181


1990 - United Nations (UN)