How Much International Aid Does Israel Receive?


General Reference (not clearly pro or con)
Susan Rice, DPhil, National Security Advisor, stated the following in her Sep. 14, 2016 article titled "The U.S. Is Making a Historic Investment to Protect the Security of Israel," available at the White House website:

"Over the past eight years, the United States has provided Israel with almost $24 billion in military aid. We've invested over $3 billion in Iron Dome and other missile defense technologies, which have saved countless Israeli lives...

Today, we are signing a memorandum of understanding—or a MOU—to provide Israel $38 billion in military aid over ten years, including $33 billion in foreign military financing funds and an unprecedented commitment of $5 billion for missile defense. This marks a significant increase over our existing funding, and it will ensure that Israel has the support it needs to defend itself by itself and to preserve its qualitative military edge.

This is the single largest pledge of military assistance—to any country—in American history."

Sep. 14, 2016 - Susan Rice, DPhil 

Jeremy M. Sharp, MA, Specialist in Middle Eastern Affairs at The Congressional Research Service (CRS), in an Apr. 11, 2014 CRS report titled "U.S. Foreign Aid to Israel," available at the U.S. Department of State website, wrote:

"Israel is the largest cumulative recipient of U.S. foreign assistance since World War II. To date, the United States has provided Israel $121 billion (current, or non-inflation-adjusted, dollars) in bilateral assistance. Almost all U.S. bilateral aid to Israel is in the form of military assistance, although in the past Israel also received significant economic assistance…

The FY2014 Consolidated Appropriations Act (P.L. 113-76) provides the President's full $3.1 billion request in FMF for Israel. In addition, it provides another $504 million in funding for research, development, and production of Israel's Iron Dome anti-rocket system ($235 million) and of the joint U.S.-Israel missile defense systems David's Sling ($149.7 million), the Arrow improvement program (or Arrow II, $44.3 million), and Arrow III ($74.7 million).

For FY2015, the Administration is requesting $3.1 billion in FMF [Foreign Military Financing] to Israel and $10 million in Migration and Refugee Assistance. The Missile Defense Agency's FY2015 request for joint U.S.-Israeli programs is $96.8 million. The Administration also is requesting $175.9 million for Iron Dome…

Israel is the largest recipient of U.S. Foreign Military Financing. For FY2015, the President's request for Israel would encompass approximately 55% of total FMF funding worldwide. Annual FMF grants to Israel represent 23% to 25% of the overall Israeli defense budget."

Apr. 11, 2014 - Jeremy M. Sharp, MA 
Congressional Research Service (CRS) 

Richard H. Curtiss, Co-Founder and Executive Editor of the Washington Report on Middle East Affairs (WRMEA) at the time of the quote, in a Jan. 5, 2011 article titled "The Cost of Israel to U.S. Taxpayers: True Lies about U.S. Aid to Israel," published on the Media Monitors Network (MMN) website, wrote:

"After the United States, the principal donor of both economic and military aid to Israel is Germany.

By far the largest component of German aid has been in the form of restitution payments to victims of Nazi atrocities. But there also has been extensive German military assistance to Israel during and since the Gulf war, and a variety of German educational and research grants go to Israeli institutions. The total of German assistance in all of these categories to the Israeli government, Israeli individuals and Israeli private institutions has been some $31 billion or $5,345 per capita."

Jan.5, 2011 - Richard H. Curtiss 

The Jewish Virtual Library, in its website's "U.S. Foreign Aid to Israel: Total Aid 1949-present" section (accessed Apr. 30, 2015), offered the following chart of yearly amounts given by the United States to Israel (in millions of dollars):

Year

Military^

Economic*

Refugee Resettlement°

ASHA**

All Other

Total

TOTAL

$83,435.9

$32,338.5

$1,688.2

$162.1

$2,847.3

$120,472.0

1949

 

 

 

 

100.0

$100.0

1950

 

 

 

 

 

 

1951

 

0.1

 

 

35.0

$35.1

1952

 

63.7

 

 

22.7

$86.4

1953

 

73.6

 

 

 

$73.6

1954

 

54.0

 

 

20.7

$74.7

1955

 

41.5

 

 

11.2

$52.7

1956

 

24.0

 

 

26.8

$50.8

1957

 

26.8

 

 

14.1

$40.9

1958

 

24.0

 

 

61.4

$85.4

1959

0.4

19.2

 

 

33.7

$53.3

1960

0.5

23.9

 

 

31.8

$56.2

1961

 

24.5

 

 

53.4

$77.9

1962

13.2

45.4

 

 

34.8

$93.4

1963

13.3

45.0

 

 

29.6

$87.9

1964

 

20.0

 

 

17.0

$37.0

1965

12.9

20.0

 

 

32.2

$65.1

1966

90.0

10.0

 

 

26.8

$126.8

1967

7.0

5.5

 

1.0

10.2

$23.7

1968

25.0

 

 

6.0

75.5

$106.5

1969

85.0

 

 

 

75.3

$160.3

1970

30.0

 

 

12.5

51.1

$93.6

1971

545.0

 

 

2.5

86.8

$634.3

1972

300.0

50.0

 

5.6

125.3

$480.9

1973

307.5

50.0

50.0

4.4

80.9

$492.8

1974

2,482.7

50.0

36.5

3.3

73.8

$2,646.3

1975

300.0

344.5

40.0

2.5

116.0

$803.0

1976

1,500.0

700.0

15.0

3.6

144.5

$2,363.1

1977

200.0

735.0

15.0

4.6

32.9

$987.5

1978

1,000.0

785.0

20.0

5.4

12.4

$1,822.8

1979

1,000.0

785.0

25.0

4.2

98.8

$1,913.0

1980

4,000.0

785.0

25.0

4.1

331.9

$5,146.0

1981

1,000.0

764.0

25.0

2.0

222.4

$2,013.4

1982

1,400.0

806.0

12.5

3.0

29.0

$2,250.5

1983

1,400.0

785.0

12.5

3.1

5.0

$2,205.6

1984

1,700.0

910.0

12.5

4.1

5.0

$2,361.6

1985

1,700.0

1,950.0

15.0

4.7

7.0

$3,676.7

1986

1,722.6

1,898.4

12.0

5.5

25.0

$3,663.5

1987

1,800.0

1,200.0

25.0

5.2

10.0

$3.040.2

1988

1,800.0

1,200.0

25.0

4.9

13.5

$3,043.4

1989

1,800.0

1,200.0

28.0

6.9

10.7

$3,045.6

1990

1,792.3

1,194.8

29.9

3.5

414.4

$3,434.9

1991

1,800.0

1,850.0

45.0

2.6

14.7

$3,712.3

1992

1,800.0

1,200.0

80.0

3.5

16.5

$3,100.0

1993

1,800.0

1,200.0

80.0

2.5

20.9

$3,103.4

1994

1,800.0

1,200.0

80.0

2.7

14.5

$3,097.2

1995

1,800.0

1,200.0

80.0

2.9

19.5

$3,102.4

1996

1,800.0

1,200.0

80.0

3.3

64.0

$3,147.3

1997

1,800.0

1,200.0

80.0

2.1

50.0

$3,132.1

1998

1,800.0

1,200.0

80.0

 

 

$3,080.0

1999

1,860.0

1,080.0

70.0

 

 

$3,010.0

2000

3,120.0

949.1

60.0

2.8

 

$4,132.0

2001

1,975.6

838.2

60.0

2.3

 

$2,876.1

2002

2,040.0

720.0

60.0

2.7

28.0

$2,850.7

2003

3,086.4

596.1

59.6

3.1

 

$3,745.2

2004

2,147.3

477.2

49.7

3.2

9.9

$2,687.3

2005

2,202.2

357.0

50.0

3.0

 

$2,612.2

2006

2,257.0

237.0

40.0

 

0.5

$2,534.5

2007

2,340.0

120.0

40.0

3.0

0.2

$2,503.2

2008

2,380.0

 

40.0

3.9

 

$2,423.9

2009

2,550.0

 

30.0

3.9

 

$2,583.9

2010

2,775.0

 

25.0

3.8

 

$2,803.8

2011

3,000.0

 

25.0

4.2

 

$3,029.2

2012

3,075.0

 

20.0

3.0

 

$3,098.0

2013

3,100.0

 

15.0

 

 

$3,115.0

2014

3,100.0

 

15.0

 

 

$3,115.0

TOTAL

$83,435.9

$32,338.5

$1,688.2

$162.1

$2,847.3

$120,472.0

^ Military aid: 1959-1973 (Loans); 1974-1984 (Loans & Grants); 1984-Present (Grants)
* Economic aid is combination of grants and loans. Israel stopped receiving economic aid of any sort in 2007
° Refugee resettlement aid is earmarked for the Jewish Agency/United Israel Appeal to help transport and resettle immigrants in Israel. It was primarily used to help Soviet immigrants in the 1980s and 1990s. Today it is used for Ethiopian immigrants.
** This is funding allocated to American Schools and Hospitals Abroad (ASHA)
† Includes Food for Peace (loans & grants); Export-Import Bank aid; Housing Loans; Cooperative Development aid; and, others.


Apr. 30, 2015 - Jewish Virtual Library